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Straight double quotes to curly double quotes and straight single quotes to curly single quotes

Automating “curly” quotes in rich text fields

One of our clients recently came to us with an interesting problem. When end users type content into a rich text field, double quotes, single quotes and apostrophes are not “smart.” That is, the quotes and apostrophes are straight instead of curly — typographically speaking, they are inch and feet characters.

An editor might type this:

  • J. R. R. Tolkien wrote "The Lord of the Rings," a trilogy of novels that serve as a sequel to Tolkien's "The Hobbit."

But really want this:

  • J. R. R. Tolkien wrote “The Lord of the Rings,” a trilogy of novels that serve as a sequel to Tolkien’s “The Hobbit.”

Here's how we created a script to automate search and replace for curly quotes and implemented an easy-to-use button in the client’s CMS to run the task.

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Building an accessible website: Auditing your website for accessibility

The reasons for bringing your website in line with the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 are well documented. Whatever your rationale for embarking on this worthy task, you will need to assess your current online presence for compliance.

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Insufficient contrasting text elements on your website will limit your audience by preventing users who have difficulty distinguishing colours from comfortably consuming your content. 

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Building an accessible website: Writing accessible alt tags for images

Creating alt tags that conform to Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) ensures all of your readers can have access to your website's images. Here's a look at how to create effective alt tags for web accessibility.

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